Anyone trained in CNC machines?


muiris

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for that sort of investment you could do a proper mechanical engineering course.
Agree with this. It would be ideal for getting into the automotive industry. You can open more doors with a degree compared to an apprenticeship.
 



civicx3

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Yeah I'm design engineer. I work for a sub contractor for Rolls Royce working on new Trent XWB gas turbine engines. Whatever systems RR use, we have to use. It's a really good program to use, quite in-depth but not the easiest.
sounds like a interesting job, ive got myself a 30day trial of solid works, taking some getting used to but the tutorials are good

one thing i struggle with is in depth mathematics and been told you need to be good at it to survive CAD / CNC machines?
 


urban boy

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You need to be good with numbers, but dont worry about it too much. Lots of help pages and solutions on screen on most modern CNC machines.

I run Haas Mini Mill, Daewoo Puma Lathe and next week CMZ TL lathe.

I self taught, as the guy who was running the CNC machines left quite suddenly, i was a manual guy mostly on Milling machines. I have been at my Company 20 years this month and still love it, now a machine shop Manager and on a good wack.

A bonus if your a proper car nut, is you will be looking for things to make.

Software, Solid works is cool as recognized all over. Cheaper options Alpha Edit, Bobcad, Edgecam and One CNC which is what i use for Milling.

I write long hand still for the Lathes, bit old fashioned and time consuming, but helps learn and take in exactly what your asking the machine to do.

On the newer machines for example CMZ Lathe, you can use it's system called 'Manual i' so the computer allready has set templates be it turning, drilling Threading Cycles, you just fill in the parameters required to make your part.

If you have no machining experiance, then it may be wise to get yourself to a local machine shop and even check out some manual machining, it will teach you workholding speeds and feeds,and how to plan your job.


Good luck, and most of all enjoy it.
 


Higmeister

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sounds like a interesting job, ive got myself a 30day trial of solid works, taking some getting used to but the tutorials are good

one thing i struggle with is in depth mathematics and been told you need to be good at it to survive CAD / CNC machines?
Trigonometry is really all you need to know unless you go into the analysis side of things
 




civicx3

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It looks to me like AutoCAD is the most popular 2D software to learn with solidworks being a very popular 3D program, this is just going by the amount of employers ive seen saying they use AutoCAD and solidworks. Is this true, AutoCAD and solidworks the best ones to get into?


You need to be good with numbers, but dont worry about it too much. Lots of help pages and solutions on screen on most modern CNC machines.

I run Haas Mini Mill, Daewoo Puma Lathe and next week CMZ TL lathe.

I self taught, as the guy who was running the CNC machines left quite suddenly, i was a manual guy mostly on Milling machines. I have been at my Company 20 years this month and still love it, now a machine shop Manager and on a good wack.

A bonus if your a proper car nut, is you will be looking for things to make.

Software, Solid works is cool as recognized all over. Cheaper options Alpha Edit, Bobcad, Edgecam and One CNC which is what i use for Milling.

I write long hand still for the Lathes, bit old fashioned and time consuming, but helps learn and take in exactly what your asking the machine to do.

On the newer machines for example CMZ Lathe, you can use it's system called 'Manual i' so the computer allready has set templates be it turning, drilling Threading Cycles, you just fill in the parameters required to make your part.

If you have no machining experiance, then it may be wise to get yourself to a local machine shop and even check out some manual machining, it will teach you workholding speeds and feeds,and how to plan your job.


Good luck, and most of all enjoy it.

Sounds like your in a good place, did you train as a apprentice? If so how long for? Im seeing most train for 2 years or the advanced apprentices go for 3 years.

The CAD side of things im liking, not sure how id get on at programming but there seems to be a demand for CAD designers all over the UK which is good, where i live is just depressing, its a pensioner paradise, a place to end up when your old so i need to gtfo of here!

Trigonometry is really all you need to know unless you go into the analysis side of things
Good to know, cheers
 

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msc52

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Just had demos on Solidworks and Autocad they both do the same stuff its down to personal preference.
 


civicx3

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Does anyone know some of the best places to go for a apprenticeship or doesn't it really matter? Im finding places all over the UK who are offering slightly different things

For the guys who have done apprenticeships where did you stay during the week assuming you didn't do it locally? I live in the middle of nowhere so will have to move or rent somewhere

:nice:
 


CR1S

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Well tbh a lot of colleges are the same. Useless. I think you'd be better off trying to shadow some one on Saturdays or something and then trying to get a job as a trainee. I don't feel a lot of the colleges have what's needed to really get you good at it. I work on the maintenance on Star CNC lathes. I started with no experience and worked my way up and now I'm at college as well. It is good if you are a car kinda guy cuz it's always hands on
 



civicx3

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Well tbh a lot of colleges are the same. Useless. I think you'd be better off trying to shadow some one on Saturdays or something and then trying to get a job as a trainee. I don't feel a lot of the colleges have what's needed to really get you good at it. I work on the maintenance on Star CNC lathes. I started with no experience and worked my way up and now I'm at college as well. It is good if you are a car kinda guy cuz it's always hands on
Aren't the apprenticeships like 1 day a week of college and the rest are hands on shadowing someone

Where are you based?
Mid wales, about a hour north of Cardiff
 



Higmeister

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Autocad is mostly for drawings etc.
Pretty much, mainly 2D and I don't know many people that actually use it in Engineering.

With a CAD program like Solidworks you make a virtual 3D model and then you can bring it in to a drafting sheet where you can dimensions it all up with your tolerances etc. So in my eyes autocad is useless
 


civicx3

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Pretty much, mainly 2D and I don't know many people that actually use it in Engineering.

With a CAD program like Solidworks you make a virtual 3D model and then you can bring it in to a drafting sheet where you can dimensions it all up with your tolerances etc. So in my eyes autocad is useless
Yeah ive been playing with solidworks for a while now, very cool program!
 


wizardmanjm

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I am, Most CNC operators go through an apprenticeship of some sorts. And most learn on the job. Colleges/training schools can only teach you so much, ie the basics.
Im in the oil and gas industry, work is ok can be a good challenge having to program new things etc and the wage is pretty good, helps living near Aberdeen!

Murray
Stumbled upon this randomly, you don’t happen to know Steven Thomson? Drove an e46 M3 and a bunch of polos, one of which is a black Mk2 Turbo?

I’m only asking as he also lives up in Aberdeen and worked in the oil industry
 



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