Anyone trained in CNC machines?


civicx3

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Been thinking about a new career path and have been looking into CNC courses for the past few days as it seems the skills can lead to a lot of different jobs and careers with a couple id love to do

What im wondering is, is there any guys on here trained in CNC machines ( milling, lathes etc.. ) If so where did you train and for how long?

:nice:
 




Murray

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Been thinking about a new career path and have been looking into CNC courses for the past few days as it seems the skills can lead to a lot of different jobs and careers with a couple id love to do

What im wondering is, is there any guys on here trained in CNC machines ( milling, lathes etc.. ) If so where did you train and for how long?

:nice:
I am, Most CNC operators go through an apprenticeship of some sorts. And most learn on the job. Colleges/training schools can only teach you so much, ie the basics.
Im in the oil and gas industry, work is ok can be a good challenge having to program new things etc and the wage is pretty good, helps living near Aberdeen!

Murray
 


civicx3

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I am, Most CNC operators go through an apprenticeship of some sorts. And most learn on the job. Colleges/training schools can only teach you so much, ie the basics.
Im in the oil and gas industry, work is ok can be a good challenge having to program new things etc and the wage is pretty good, helps living near Aberdeen!

Murray
thanks, how long did you train as a apprentice? The total cost for all the courses is pretty expensive and i agree it would be best to learn one to one with someone who already does it

Only trouble i can see is finding a tutor and living on a apprentice wage for a while
 


Murray

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Most engineering apprenticeships last 4 years. My apprenticeship was machining based.
My 1st year was spent in a training centre, then the next 3 years on the job with your employer. day release to college 1 day a week.
 


civicx3

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Most engineering apprenticeships last 4 years. My apprenticeship was machining based.
My 1st year was spent in a training centre, then the next 3 years on the job with your employer. day release to college 1 day a week.
thats a long time to train at 26, il have a think about it

thanks for the info :nice:
 


kulo

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Yeah did apprenticeship
learn new job skills that will set you up for the future
and work anywhere in the world machining
 


Higmeister

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Train yourself on a CAD package like Solidworks and it will open more doors and better opportunities
 


civicx3

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Are some apprenticeships better than others? are there certain things to look out for? Ive found a few around the UK which seem slightly different to others in terms of what you learn

Yeah did apprenticeship
learn new job skills that will set you up for the future
and work anywhere in the world machining
the ability to work anywhere is a big part of me wanting to go for it

Train yourself on a CAD package like Solidworks and it will open more doors and better opportunities
thanks il check that out, im guessing to buy a legit copy its quite expensive?
 




Oxigen_cult

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You should train first programming yourself, and only when you have a minimal knowledge, jump to a CAM program.

In my job I retrofit CNC machines, and on the last one and a half month I make the code for various parts.
 


Higmeister

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Are some apprenticeships better than others? are there certain things to look out for? Ive found a few around the UK which seem slightly different to others in terms of what you learn



the ability to work anywhere is a big part of me wanting to go for it



thanks il check that out, im guessing to buy a legit copy its quite expensive?
Yip, solidworks is probably 2-4k. If you go onto their site I think you can get a 30 day trial. The software comes with some good tutorials to get you started
 


civicx3

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You should train first programming yourself, and only when you have a minimal knowledge, jump to a CAM program.

In my job I retrofit CNC machines, and on the last one and a half month I make the code for various parts.
Making code must be complicated / stressful !

Yip, solidworks is probably 2-4k. If you go onto their site I think you can get a 30 day trial. The software comes with some good tutorials to get you started
Wow wasn't expecting it to be that much, im playing with some CAD software already and its great, insanely complicated at the minute but very impressive! Tutorials are very handy
 


Higmeister

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I'm using Unigraphics in work for Rolls Royce and I'm sure I heard someone saying the cost of a licence was 20k. Ridiculous
 


civicx3

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I'm using Unigraphics in work for Rolls Royce and I'm sure I heard someone saying the cost of a licence was 20k. Ridiculous
20k is madness. There must be some serious time and effort going into making it but 20k! :wow:

what do you do for a job, CAD designer? working in the automotive scene would be my ideal area!
 


Higmeister

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Yeah I'm design engineer. I work for a sub contractor for Rolls Royce working on new Trent XWB gas turbine engines. Whatever systems RR use, we have to use. It's a really good program to use, quite in-depth but not the easiest.
 


leeK9

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for that sort of investment you could do a proper mechanical engineering course.
 



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